History of Audi RS in pictures

In 2002, Audi unleashed an entirely new model to its RS line-up – the A6-derived RS6 saloon and estate. With a muscular body, aluminium mirror caps and two large oval pipes for the exhaust, both the estate and saloon had an intimidating presence.

Again, Cosworth handled the engine – its 4.2-litre V8 endowed with two turbochargers for good measure, serving up 444bhp. Partnered with Audi’s five-speed tiptronic transmission, it enabled the RS6’s hefty frame to dash from 0-62mph in 4.7sec, while again being reined in at 155mph. The RS6 Plus made its debut in 2004, with power increased to 480bhp and speed limited to 174mph. However, the C5 RS6 was plagued by vague steering feel and a heavily understeering character.

Audi regained form in 2006, with Quattro GmbH splitting its efforts in order to design and develop the R8 supercar, as well as launching an all-new RS4 after a long hiatus. Available in saloon, Avant and cabriolet guise, the B7 RS4 variant was, for a long time, regarded as Quattro GmbH’s ‘sweet spot’ and finest RS model. Drive was supplied by an all-new, high-revving 4.2-litre naturally aspirated V8 shared with the R8, pumping out 414bhp at a heady 7800rpm and mated to a six-speed manual gearbox. 0-62mph was taken care of in 4.8sec while (still conforming to the voluntary agreement) being limited to 155mph. Derestricted B7 RS4s were capable of cracking 180mph.

After just 18 months, Audi brought a premature halt to the B7 production line. To this day, the beautifully proportioned B7 RS4 is fondly remembered at Autocar for its fluid ride, engaging handling and superb powertrain. 

In 2008, the engineers at Neckarsulm went on a power craze, launching the ‘C6’ Audi RS6 with a 572bhp twin-turbocharged 5.0-litre V10, spearheading its BMW M5 and Mercedes E63 AMG rivals in the evident ‘power war’ at that time. Despite a chunky kerb weight of 2025kg, the beefy RS6 could still hustle to 62mph in 4.6sec, though even on a combined cycle fuel consumption was poor. Despite possessing very fast acceleration for such a big car, some questioned the integrity of the RS badge – it was refined, almost too civilised and heavier at the front than perhaps was necessary.

The following year and Audi had the Porsche Cayman firmly locked in its crosshairs when it released the TT RS. Possessing a more anabolic appearance and a lower ride height over the standard TT with a large rear spoiler, the TT RS looked a much meaner machine. A 335bhp 2.5-litre five-pot turbocharged engine provided power.

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